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New guide on soilless culture available

Soilless cultivation techniques (including hydroponic systems) have attracted growing attention as a way of growing horticultural crops more efficiently without taking up more land. These controlled environment systems are also less vulnerable to climate change and are particularly suited to urban farming as part of the shift to more localised, circular food systems.

Burleigh Dodds Science Publishing Limited has recently published the new book “Advances in Horticultural Soilless Culture”. Authors from around the world explained in three parts of the book, called “Materials”, “Technologies” and “Case Studies”, the advances in soilless culture and growing media thoroughly, scientifically, and in an understandable language.

This collection focuses on innovative systems and growing media used in terms of substrate properties, plant performance, and sustainability. The latter is recently attracting the interest of substrate producers, growers, users and consumers. New materials alternative to peat are investigated. Water and fertiliser use efficiency, modelling, the application of “machine learning” and “Internet of Things” and the new advances in vertical farming complete this book.

With its international range of expert authors, Advances in horticultural soilless culture aims to be a standard reference for university and other researchers involved in horticultural science, hydroponics and soilless cultivation. It will also be a valuable resource for government and other agencies supporting vertical and urban farming systems, as well as companies involved in this sector.

Copies can be ordered at Burleigh Dodd's website. 

 


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