Egyptian mango farmers introduced new ventilation techniques, greenhouses, pruning, and fertilizers

Every year, more than 43 million tons of mangos are produced globally, and in Egypt's northern canal city of Ismailia, growers are learning to beat the heat with new adaptations. Rising temperatures and black mold killed 70 percent of Ismailia's mango crops last year. However, this year, things are almost back to normal. Egyptian mango farmers introduced new ventilation techniques, greenhouses, pruning, and fertilizers.

"Regarding mitigating climate change, for foreign crops, the trees are not so high, so we make greenhouses to cover the trees from high temperature and to protect them from the cold as well," said local mango farmer Mahmoud Tohamy. "This also reduces the pesticides we use, so the product would have the needed specifications and would merit export. As for the local crops, the trees are high, so we make corridors with pruning to allow sun and air."

Another adaptation was to bring in different foreign species of mangos.

Source: i24news.tv


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