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Chile: Worms to improve soil fertility

Restoring the original properties of the soil seems to be the goal for the growers of the Chilean province of Quillota, who, with technical assistance from INDAP's Local Development Programme, are using worms to improve the conditions for vegetable production.

In the case of the grower Alicia Pereira, of San Pedro, who has been using this innovative system for the past three years to obtain fertiliser for her crops: "plants do not burn, because no chemicals are used, only the worms' humus. Everyone admires my chards, as they are pretty and green," assures Pereira.

As explained by the technical head of Local Development Programme Quillota I, Nora Lefno, "the process has a series of advantages, such as the recycling of the organic material that prevents the burning of vegetable waste, the lower production costs, as no fertilisers are used, and the improvement in the soil's structure. This is why we planned to support those growers to help them produce their own worm humus using the organic waste from their own crops."

Organic waste
Another grower benefited by the breeding of worms is Isabel Toledo, of Santa Olivia, who makes use of worm humus to prepare the soil of her greenhouses and compost tea through technified irrigation. "It is really good because fewer chemicals are used and the plant grows healthier. In my case, tomatoes are tastier. It also helps preventing pests."

It is worth noting that humus is compost obtained from the digestive process of worms fed with organic waste, such as plant debris, crop waste and guano, among others.


Source: fotoquinta.cl

Publication date: 10/8/2013

 


 

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