Announcements

Job offersmore »



Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

  • No news has been published yesterday.

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




US (FL): Responses of tomato to potassium rates in a calcareous soil

Florida produces the most vegetables in the United States during the winter season with favorable weather conditions. However, vegetables grown on calcareous soils in Florida have no potassium (K) fertilizer recommendation.

The objective of a new study was to evaluate the effects of K rates on leaf tissue K concentration (LTKC), plant biomass, fruit yield, and postharvest quality of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) grown on a calcareous soil. The experiment was conducted during the winter seasons of 2014 and 2015 in Homestead, FL. Potassium fertilizers were applied at rates of 0, 56, 93, 149, 186, and 223 kg·ha−1 of K and divided into preplant dry fertilizer and fertigation during the season.

No deficiency of LTKC was found at 30 days after transplanting (DAT) in both years. Potassium rates lower than 149 kg·ha−1 resulted in deficient LTKC at 95 DAT in 2014. No significant responses to K rates were observed in plant (leaf, stem, and root combined) dry weight biomass at all the sampling dates in both years. However, at 95 DAT, fruit dry weight biomass increased with increasing K rates to 130 and 147 kg·ha−1, reaching a plateau thereafter indicated by the linear-plateau models in 2014 and 2015, respectively.

Predicted from quadratic and linear-plateau models, K rates of 173 and 178 kg·ha−1 were considered as the optimum rates for total season marketable yields in 2014 and 2015, respectively. Postharvest qualities, including fruit firmness, pH, and total soluble solids (TSS) content, were not significantly affected by K rates in both years.

Overall, K rate of 178 kg·ha−1 was sufficient to grow tomato during the winter season in calcareous soils with 78 to 82 mg·kg−1 of ammonium bicarbonate-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (AB-DTPA)-extracted K in Florida.

Publication date: 6/30/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

11/16/2017 Reduced ultraviolet light transmission increases insecticide longevity
11/15/2017 UK: Growers growing with a difference
11/14/2017 Indo-Dutch cooperation on crop residue management
11/14/2017 One step closer to crops with twice the yield
11/13/2017 Vegetable grafting: principles and practices
11/10/2017 More accurate crop research available
11/10/2017 US: $600,000 in grants to help specialty crop growers in Colorado
11/10/2017 South Africa: Western Cape could get Centre of Excellence
11/8/2017 Update on Dutch high wire trials in energy efficient systems
11/8/2017 Israeli season kicks off with high prospects, threats and opportunities
11/8/2017 US: Successful growing season with new arugula varieties
11/8/2017 Circadian clock discovery could help boost water efficiency in food plants
11/7/2017 Hungary to help modernise Uganda's agriculture sector
11/3/2017 US: Nebraska looks to solve global food security by sharing its knowledge of irrigation
11/2/2017 NFT cultivation system boosts Lebanese lettuce production
11/2/2017 US (MI): End of season for double-cropped raspberries under high tunnels
11/2/2017 UK: Ending water abstraction licensing exemptions
11/1/2017 "HPS and LED top lighting best tomato recipe in winter"
10/31/2017 Vegetable crop conservation in the U.S. National Plant Germplasm System
10/27/2017 Strong support to feed the world through boosting photosynthetic potential