Announcements

Job offersmore »





Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

  • No news has been published yesterday.

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




US (CA): Berkeley Lab awarded $4.6M for ag tech research

As advanced as agriculture has become, there remains a pressing need for nondestructive ways to ”see” into the soil. Now the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) has awarded $4.6 million to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) for two innovative projects to address this gap, giving farmers important information to increase crop yields while also promoting the storage of carbon in soil.

One project aims to use electrical current to image the root system, which will accelerate the breeding of crops with roots that are tailored to specific conditions (such as drought). The other project will develop a new imaging technique based on neutron scattering to measure the distribution of carbon and other elements in the soil.

“Both technologies could be transformational for agriculture ⎯ for quantifying belowground plant traits and where carbon and other elements are distributed⎯and will enable the next generation of predictive models for agriculture and climate,” said Eoin Brodie, deputy director of Berkeley Lab’s Climate & Ecosystem Sciences Division and a microbiologist who is contributing to both projects. “They’re windows into the soil, something that we urgently need.”

Berkeley Lab received these competitive awards from ARPA-E’s Rhizosphere Observations Optimizing Terrestrial Sequestration (ROOTS) program, which seeks to develop crops that take carbon out of the atmosphere and store it in soil — enabling a 50 percent increase in carbon deposition depth and accumulation while also reducing nitrous oxide emissions by 50 percent and increasing water productivity by 25 percent.

Soil carbon deficits are a global phenomenon resulting from many decades of industrial agriculture. Soils have the capacity to store significant quantities of carbon, reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations while also enhancing soil fertility and water retention.

Read more at the University of California website

Publication date: 1/9/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

6/22/2017 How startups are changing the face of Indian agriculture
6/22/2017 More effective steaming via sandwich steaming with spiked steaming hoods
6/22/2017 New methods for computer vision in horti- and agriculture
6/21/2017 African countries to combat food crisis with open data
6/16/2017 "Variable-rate fertigation can be simple and improve sustainability"
6/15/2017 US (CA): Robots wielding water knives are the future of farming
6/14/2017 US (CA): Ag-bio startups seed the Bay Area
6/14/2017 Tecnici Network: strategies and training for the Sicilian greenhouse sector
6/14/2017 From Uganda to Mexico, celebrating one year of HortiMaX-Go!
6/14/2017 China: Visualization management on upstream operations
6/14/2017 Gert van Straalen, Thaneth Earth, explains why he prefers HPS over LED
6/12/2017 China: Visualization management on upstream operations
6/12/2017 NASA tech to grow vegetables without soil tested in Peru
6/12/2017 Study reveals how a hormone increases sucrose accumulation
6/12/2017 Chainless filter cloth now comes with Aqua-Hort system
6/9/2017 Solving Africa’s food insecurity through biotechnology
6/7/2017 New device enables accurate forecasting of produce yields and quality
6/6/2017 Journal of Environmental Horticulture expands scope and accessibility
5/31/2017 "Farming revolution to place data centre stage"
5/26/2017 LEDs still have a long way to go