Announcements

Job offersmore »



Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




Japanese research: Plants can sense gravity

In an interesting research conducted by experts in Japan, it has been discovered that plants can sense gravity. The study published in Nature Microgravity journal states that using samples grown on board the International Space Station, the research team highlighted the valuable contribution of the gravity-sensitive CsPIN1 protein to this process.

The team of researchers from Japan's Tohoku University have found out how a protein helps plants sense gravity to boost their chances of survival. After cucumber seedlings germinated under the very weak gravity—or microgravity—conditions of the International Space Station, this conclusion was drawn.

Plants are experts in survival and can control the direction of their roots to maximise the use of resources around them. Using specialised cells, they can sense gravity and redistribute hormones, called auxins, to stimulate growth and allow vital features of the plant to develop.

Further, the report states that the role of the protein in facilitating the transport of BSE 0.63 % the growth hormones had first been suggested in previous experiments conducted on Earth.

To gain further insight, the researchers loaded cucumber seeds into specially designed canisters, which were sent up to the space station.

Cucumbers were chosen for the study as they -- like other "cucurbitaceous" seedlings such as melons, pumpkins and squash -- feature specialised protuberances, or pegs, whose formation is regulated by gravity. These pegs form during the plant's early growth stage to help the seedlings emerge from their hard seed coat and anchor the developing plant in the soil while its roots form.

The experiment showed that CsPIN1 protein can relocalise under the influence of gravity.

Specifically, this change in the position of protein was found to occur in the so-called transition zone of the cucumber seedling where the pegs develop.

This behaviour stimulates the formation of a cellular canal capable of transporting growth hormones from one side of this zone to the other, the study said.

These findings point towards the mechanism by which the seeds are able to turn on and off the growth of their anchoring pegs in relation to their orientation with respect to gravity. And, as result, boost their chances of survival.

Source: IANS, Zeenews.india.com

Publication date: 1/3/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

10/20/2017 New idea could mean sweeter strawberries with less sugar
10/19/2017 DuPont Pioneer, Broad Institute enable democratic CRISPR licensing
10/19/2017 Vineland reflects on a decade of innovation
10/19/2017 Germany: KfW & Crop Trust sign agreement to safeguard crop diversity
10/19/2017 UNH to develop strawberry varieties specifically for U.S. organic production
10/13/2017 UK: New raspberry varieties Malling Bella and Malling Charm launched
10/13/2017 "Disease-resistant GMO tomato blocked by public fears"
10/11/2017 How Virtual Reality can enhance breeding
10/11/2017 Gabe Patin: Award of Distinction for Contributions to Seed Biotechnology Center at UC Davis
10/11/2017 Study shows way to create common ground about gene-editing
10/10/2017 "NSAI working to free Indian seed firms from monopolistic MNCs"
10/10/2017 DNA of the world’s largest collection of lettuce to be unravelled
10/10/2017 UNH celebrates contributions of researcher Brent Loy
10/10/2017 HM Clause to introduce new Adora tomato in Madrid
10/9/2017 FUTA introduces new variety of tomatoes to Nigeria
10/6/2017 Mexico: Researchers create a new variety of chili pepper
10/6/2017 New CN Seeds varieties finding favour with Spanish growers
10/6/2017 Enza Zaden presents options for salad bar of the future
10/5/2017 Spain: Campaign against illegal reproduction of plants
10/5/2017 China: Hazera showcases new tomato in Xichang