Announcements

Job offersmore »



Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

  • No news has been published yesterday.

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




Be cautious when using slow release fertilizers

Fertilization with slow-release fertilizers has recently caused some damage in horticulture, as reported by Agro Expertiseburo in its newsletter.

Coated slow fertilizers are often used in horticulture. They have a long action period, whereby the fertilizers are supposed to be gradually released over time. However, in a number of damage cases it was found that the release of fertilizers may already be very high in the first period after application. This can cause high EC levels (salinity) in the pot or release too much of a certain fertilizer (for example Ammonium). This can cause damage to young plants that still need to take root. There may also be too little release of nutrition from the slow-release fertilizer at the end of cultivation, which means adding more fertilizer incurring additional costs. In the meantime too much fertilizer is rinsed out, which is bad for the environment.

When choosing a fertilizer it is important to get information about:

- What is the purpose of the fertilization;
- The content of the coated granules and its properties;
- What is released when and under what circumstances;
- How safe is the product in cultivation, first acquire experience by conducting tests;
- Compare the costs and benefits of the fertilizer and consider the environmental impact.

Examination of the crop, substrate and irrigation water provides insight into whether and the extent to which the nutrition presents irregularities. Agro Expertburo can assist you in investigating the cause and establishing the extent of the damage. In these type of damage cases Agro Expertiseburo always collaborates with the laboratories and consultants of the Delft Research Group in Delfgauw.

For more information:
Agro Expertiseburo 
Distributieweg 1
2645 EG Delfgauw
T: 015 2853617
F: 015 2853486



Publication date: 12/23/2016

 


 

Other news in this sector:

2/3/2017 The benefits of fertigation and irrigation control
1/24/2017 UK: Attention to young plant nutrition pays off in strawberries
1/23/2017 "10% yield increase with Nature's Source Plant Food"
1/17/2017 Researchers discover greenhouse bypass for nitrogen
1/11/2017 Relationship between fertility extremes and growing medium pH
1/10/2017 Prehistoric compost could aid hydroponic plant growth
1/10/2017 How much acid is needed to reduce water alkalinity?
1/3/2017 How fertilizer helped feed the world
12/22/2016 Prayon launches Calcium Nitrate Extra
12/14/2016 New ICL fertilizer combines nitrogen, calcium and magnesium
12/6/2016 Optimizing fertilizer rates for wild blueberry
12/5/2016 US(TX): Fertilizer trials at Hort Americas demo greenhouse
11/28/2016 "We need a new approach for better soil"
11/22/2016 What’s in healthy soil?
11/18/2016 EU delays ChemChina/Syngenta merger decision to March 29
11/15/2016 AHDB publishes comprehensive review of nutrient management
10/25/2016 How to build a profitable fertigation system in a hoophouse
10/17/2016 Improved growth through fertilizer optimization in wild blueberry
10/12/2016 US (MN): Fertilizer, plastic mulch treatments benefit tomato yield
10/11/2016 UNH scientists get $1.5 million to investigate human impact on soil microbes