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Dutch crops grown on 'Mars' soil found safe to eat

Dutch scientists said Thursday crops of four vegetables and cereals grown on soil similar to that on Mars have been found safe to eat, amid plans for the first manned mission to the planet.

Abundant harvests of radishes, peas, rye and tomatoes all grown on the soil were found to contain "no dangerous levels" of heavy metals, said the team from Wageningen University in the Netherlands. "These remarkable results are very promising," said senior ecologist Wieger Wamelink. "We can actually eat the radishes, peas, rye and tomatoes, and I am very curious what they will taste like."

Further tests are now needed on the remaining six crops, including potatoes, in research which is being backed by a crowd-funding campaign.


Publication date: 6/24/2016

 


 

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