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Aduno enters market with 5 basic thermal screens:

Italian screen manufacturer inspired by BIC ballpoint pen

The Italian company Aduno recently came on the market with a range of 5 new thermal screens. The company manufactures technical textiles for crop protection, horticulture and floriculture applications, and claims to be inspired by a simple, but effective product; the BIC ballpoint pen.


"Supplying simple, reliable and basic products for everyone, without neglecting quality. That is our aim," explains Elisabetta Pircher of Aduno. Aduno just entered the market for thermal screens with their new BASIC5 thermal screens.



BASIC5
"Aduno was established in 1998 and to the beginning 2012 they manufactured screens for a leading thermal screens supplier," explains Pircher. "When there came an end to this relationship we started producing a complete range of thermal screens and other technical textiles for protected crops under our own brand BASIC5."

The BASIC5 thermal screens are, as their name suggest, available in five basic versions. The manufacturer claims that the screens are simple, but suitable for heavy duty applications.

Pircher: "Over the entire range, we paid special attention to aging and wear resistance. We increased the weight and heaviness  of the screens, without affecting the performance. Our BASIC5ARGENTUM AIC 65, for example, weighs 90 g/m2, compared to 75 g/m2 (average value) of other screens available on the market. All in all, this has benefits for both the installer and the grower. The installer can work with a tougher and stronger material and the grower has got a more durable product."

Inspired by BIC
The large balpoint pen manufacturer BIC inspired Aduno. "We are humble followers of BIC, as we believe that you can always learn something from the big boys. So, just like the BIC products, we wanted a series of simple, reliable and basic products for everyone. If you have ever used a BIC balpoint pen, you might have noticed a few frills, but it’s undoubtedly efficient and meets your needs," says Pircher. "And there's more, the founder of the company was originally Italian..." she laughs.



No products in stock

Aduno doesn't have any products in stock. "Our production is made to order, in order to meet specific requests and avoid extensive warehousing costs. In addition, we can produce new on-demand variations of the BASIC5 versions with features for special new needs and applications, provided that they are of general interest or comply with our minimum production requirements," concluded Pircher.

For more information:
Aduno
Elisabetta Pircher
elisabetta@aduno.it
www.aduno.it

Publication date: 11/5/2015
Author: Elita Vellekoop
Copyright: www.hortidaily.com

 


 

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