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Cut and come again vegetables

You have heard the expression “everything old is new again.” This appears to be the case with new garden information that is appearing in some places.

The term being used is “cut and come again vegetables;” however, these are not new, unheard of plants. It’s the same familiar vegetables with a new tagline.

Cut and come again vegetables involve growing vegetables that are just harvested in a different manner than some gardeners have been using. Vegetables that have leaves growing in a rosette form are the come again choices.

A rosette simply means that the plant produces leaves in a circular form. New leaves come from the centre and the older leaves are on the outside edges.

Common vegetables like kale, collards, chard, leaf lettuce, Chinese cabbage and spinach grow as rosettes. Some that are not as common include mustard greens, cress, mizuna, endive, chervil, arugula and tatsoi.

The goal is to only harvest the oldest, outside leaves in the rosette. The centre is the growing point and keeps making more leaves.

This way, you have a continuous supply during your growing and eating season. You are not pulling out or cutting off the plant at ground level; however, this also involves caring for the plants by watering and fertilizing throughout the entire harvesting season.

Click here to read the entire article at agriview.com

Publication date: 1/23/2014

 

 
 
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