Announcements

Job offersmore »



Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




US (NJ): Student, teacher research hydroponics in India

Chatham High School science teacher Dr. Yelena Naumova and CHS senior Indira Roy, along with Dr. A.J. Both of Rutgers, have co-authored an academic paper that has been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The paper is called "Assessment of Electricity-Free Hydroponics in India: A Proof of Concept Field Study" and was published in December in Volume 10, Issue 1 of the Journal of Agricultural Science.



Last summer, Indira conducted research while she was visiting her family in Hyderabad, India. In this area, smallholder and subsistence farmers are faced with an especially challenging environment that lacks enough fertile soil, rainfall, and space for success. Indira believed that hydroponic farming might be a productive practice for these farmers, since it is a technique that doesn't rely on soil quality or rainfall, and it increases crop yield using less land area. However, conventional methods make hydroponics inaccessible for poor farmers because of the high cost of electricity needed to run the system.

Indira’s research focused on comparing a modified, electricity-free system to a conventional system. She found that while the conventional system produced a greater dry mass of crops, the modified system produced a greater volume of fresher-looking crops. The nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium contents in each were tested, and the costs involved in running each system were also examined.

Indira said, “Food security is a global issue that will require increased attention in the future.”

In reflecting on the process of writing for publication, Indira said, “Writing this paper required stating everything clearly and explaining the reasoning behind every idea. Peer review was a rigorous and slightly intimidating process, but having Dr. Naumova and Dr. Both as co-authors was super helpful because they are incredibly knowledgeable and supportive. I hope to continue investigating sustainable solutions for the future.”

Source: Chatham High School

Publication date: 12/18/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

1/18/2018 Mudslides add to farm losses in California
1/18/2018 Iran: Fifth place in global vegetable output
1/18/2018 A battery for every grower?
1/18/2018 Over 32 trillion data points give growers environmental intelligence
1/18/2018 Italy: Challenges for the professional fresh produce market
1/17/2018 HortNZ says drought threatens food supply
1/16/2018 "Indoor farming in the Middle East in acceleration"
1/15/2018 Netherlands: Application open for FoodStars Accelerator
1/15/2018 NZ: Blueberry season over earlier than usual
1/12/2018 How to get the most out of Sulfur in Aquaponics
1/12/2018 Asia: Opportunities to receive investment or access grant funding
1/11/2018 Israeli technique is giving a plug to Indian vegetable growers
1/10/2018 Essential plant elements
1/9/2018 Tomato growers in Mexico enjoying warm conditions
1/9/2018 What in your irrigation water affects your media pH?
1/8/2018 US: Five things to consider while gearing up for spring 2018
1/5/2018 How to reduce overwatering of growing media
1/5/2018 UK: Farming for the next generation
1/5/2018 "Let there be light to help tomatoes grow"
1/5/2018 Kenya: Tomato farmers cautioned over rising temperatures