Announcements

Job offersmore »



Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

  • No news has been published yesterday.

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




US (NJ): Student, teacher research hydroponics in India

Chatham High School science teacher Dr. Yelena Naumova and CHS senior Indira Roy, along with Dr. A.J. Both of Rutgers, have co-authored an academic paper that has been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

The paper is called "Assessment of Electricity-Free Hydroponics in India: A Proof of Concept Field Study" and was published in December in Volume 10, Issue 1 of the Journal of Agricultural Science.



Last summer, Indira conducted research while she was visiting her family in Hyderabad, India. In this area, smallholder and subsistence farmers are faced with an especially challenging environment that lacks enough fertile soil, rainfall, and space for success. Indira believed that hydroponic farming might be a productive practice for these farmers, since it is a technique that doesn't rely on soil quality or rainfall, and it increases crop yield using less land area. However, conventional methods make hydroponics inaccessible for poor farmers because of the high cost of electricity needed to run the system.

Indira’s research focused on comparing a modified, electricity-free system to a conventional system. She found that while the conventional system produced a greater dry mass of crops, the modified system produced a greater volume of fresher-looking crops. The nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium contents in each were tested, and the costs involved in running each system were also examined.

Indira said, “Food security is a global issue that will require increased attention in the future.”

In reflecting on the process of writing for publication, Indira said, “Writing this paper required stating everything clearly and explaining the reasoning behind every idea. Peer review was a rigorous and slightly intimidating process, but having Dr. Naumova and Dr. Both as co-authors was super helpful because they are incredibly knowledgeable and supportive. I hope to continue investigating sustainable solutions for the future.”

Source: Chatham High School

Publication date: 12/18/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

6/22/2018 US (CA): Creating online training for organic specialty crop production
6/21/2018 US (MI): "Low tunnels do not have the desired effect this year"
6/21/2018 US (CA): Growers in berry country get innovative to save water
6/21/2018 Flying greenhouse from Bremen goes into space
6/20/2018 Bas Vet new cultivation adviser
6/19/2018 Climate & Food Security programme in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda
6/19/2018 US: Low Tunnel Strawberry Production Guide released
6/18/2018 Energy-efficient practices in organic greenhouses
6/18/2018 "I feel confident we can grow Gina consistently for many years"
6/15/2018 "Early production runs ahead when eggplant plants are topped"
6/15/2018 How to impact a crop's vertical temperature profile
6/14/2018 Kazakhstan: Drip irrigation indispensable in agriculture
6/14/2018 UK: AHDB launches farm data sharing project
6/14/2018 India: HollandDoor launches new three-year horticultural programme
6/13/2018 US (TX): Helping tomato producers make better connections through grafting
6/13/2018 "Environmental changes could reduce global production of vegetables"
6/13/2018 Kyrgyz president visits Chinese ag academy
6/13/2018 Enhanced growing system with new gutter type
6/8/2018 "Create value with your own data"
6/8/2018 St. Lucia: Growers learn about greenhouse tomato cultivation