Job offersmore »

Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »

5 steps for planning a successful greenhouse expansion

When retrofitting your greenhouse is not the answer a new construction expansion may be more what you need. Planning a construction project from the ground up involves a lot of details that you may not deal with on a regular basis. Here are a few pointers to help you start:

1. Establish size and allow for future growth
Since building a new greenhouse is generally determined after production demand is assessed, this is the logical first step for establishing the size of the greenhouse footprint. Consider beyond your immediate needs and plan to allow for some future growth as well if possible.

2. Plan for optimum growth
Now consider the environment you need for optimum plant growth, and talk to your GGS rep about how extra under gutter height, additional ventilation, glazing material options, and the different styles of greenhouses can improve or detract from the environment you want.

3. Allow space for expansion of existing facilities and systems
Next you need to look at your existing facilities and systems. What is sufficient for this expansion, and what will require more capacity. This includes shipping bays, warehouse space, office space, environmental controls, and of course the heating system. You should always get a qualified greenhouse heating engineer like Niagrow to review your current greenhouse heating and your expansion plans.

4. Check your regulations
With most greenhouse builds you will need to talk to your local building inspector. Every year more regulations are put in place - make sure that your proposed expansion follows all laws and town regulations. For instance, if your building is too close to your neighbor’s land, you may have to file a variance with the town.

5. Accommodate more warehousing and storage space
If you are expanding your production space, consider that you may need more warehousing and storage space to accommodate this extra yield. Most greenhouse growers ask us to build these areas out of our greenhouse structures. Widespan greenhouses are particularly good for shipping areas.

Source: GGS

Publication date: 3/20/2017



Other news in this sector:

3/23/2018 Hydroponic greenhouse for organic ginger production
3/23/2018 Oxygen concentration in irrigation water: an underestimated factor in plant growth
3/23/2018 Russia: 20-hectare greenhouse complex opens at the end of 2019
3/22/2018 "Irish horticulture sector needs storm damage support"
3/21/2018 Boer den Hoedt moving to Dinteloord
3/21/2018 US: Michigan Farm Bureau investigates agro labor shortage
3/21/2018 Increasing quality and quantity of food in Rwanda
3/21/2018 Only 9% of greenhouse acreage worldwide is covered with glass
3/21/2018 Belgium: "We said goodbye to the coeur de boeuf"
3/20/2018 Greenhouse territory to be enlarged in Southern Kazakhstan
3/20/2018 Cryptocurrency mining heat generation to be incorporated with greenhouses
3/20/2018 Turkish governor meets with greenhouse growers
3/19/2018 UK pupils playing music using fruit in place of a mouse
3/19/2018 US (ME): UMPI announces greenhouse fundraiser, new ag degree
3/19/2018 Students of Organic Agriculture department at Gaziantep grow organic tomatoes
3/19/2018 "Our ultimate goal is to build an autonomous greenhouse"
3/16/2018 US (KS): Kansas Wheat opens 12,750 square-foot greenhouse
3/16/2018 Japan: Mitsubishi to grow cherry tomatoes
3/16/2018 US (IL): Chicago mayor breaks ground on 140,000 sq.ft. greenhouse
3/15/2018 Turkey: Tomato growers see prices double