Announcements

Job offersmore »



Tweeting Growers

Top 5 - yesterday

Top 5 - last week

Top 5 - last month

Exchange ratesmore »




UK: Harper Adams students discuss the future of food and farming post-Brexit with NFU Vice President:

"Brexit is a greater issue for the younger generation"

Balancing food and environmental needs, maintaining the flow of migrant workers to provide labour for fresh produce farms, and greater pride in British produce were just three key topics raised in a round-table discussion about Britain’s future outside the European Union.

The discussion, involving Harper Adams University students and Guy Smith, the Vice President of the NFU, aimed to look past the arguments for and against Brexit. Instead it sought the younger generation’s view of the implications of Brexit and creating a viable domestic agricultural policy.

Launching the discussion, Guy Smith said: “Brexit is a greater issue for the younger generation. Decisions being made now could colour the political framework for a generation, making it more pertinent for you than me.”

“We’ve got to be positive about our future. It’s an enormous challenge, but we mustn’t be intimidated or cowed by the enormity of the situation.”

“Lots of events are going to occur over the next two years as we negotiate our leaving terms, and so the NFU is going to have to be fast-footed and agile to react to them.”

Mr Smith began by raising a few key points: “Firstly, the possibility of access to British markets being given to overseas farmers in order to have lower-priced products, despite these countries potentially having less regulation on farming than in Britain, making it unfair competition.”

“Secondly,” he added, “farmers are part of the largest sector of the British economy – the food sector. If agricultural production was exported, then other parts of that industry could also be exported.”

Student Helen Brown, BSc (Hons) Agriculture with Crop Management, asked about the future of pesticide legislation. “If we make it harder for companies to bring pesticides into the UK, are they going to bother? Also, are our farmers going to have access to products that those in other countries do?” she asked.

Mr Smith admitted the question was on his mind too: “It is really complicated. You’re right that the legislation presently comes from Brussels, but we currently have the ability to inform the debate with science and to argue our case for local solutions.”

Click here for the complete news article on the meeting at the website of Harper Adams University


Publication date: 1/11/2017

 


 

Other news in this sector:

1/18/2017 Eden greenhouse coming to Dutch royal estate
1/18/2017 Agro Care expansion finalizes in Tunisia and Morocco
1/17/2017 Second research centre opens in Middle East
1/17/2017 How to decipher heat loss and greenhouse R-value
1/16/2017 New Hampshire high school to build greenhouse
1/16/2017 US (AK): Anchorage rooftop plans delayed
1/16/2017 Canada: Freeman Herbs sees positive effects of dynamic LEDs
1/13/2017 Icicles from overhead power lines damages Belgian greenhouses
1/12/2017 New online search tool locates Russian greenhouses
1/12/2017 US (CA): 14 affected by gas leak at Oasis greenhouse
1/11/2017 US: Specialty crops focus of Feb. 7 conference in Ohio
1/9/2017 China: Yuanxing opens new picking garden
1/6/2017 Jamaica: Santa Cruz school adopts greenhouse technology
1/6/2017 Second planting of cucumbers at Dutch Winterlight Greenhouse
1/6/2017 Over 3300 hectare slated for 2017
1/5/2017 China: Project to build solar powered 'bubble' greenhouse
1/2/2017 Qatar: Government invests in greenhouses for local farmers
12/23/2016 More growers opt for multi- layered screens
12/23/2016 France: Irrigation and fertigation challenges at research center
12/23/2016 Greenhouses for 59 more families in Armenia