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Kitchen garden plays music for plants

Natufia Lab has unveiled a fully-autonomous growing machine that could mean you never kill your plants again.

The sleek, hydroponic Kitchen Garden revealed at CES in Las Vegas self-regulates the conditions inside to ensure the best growth conditions, and it even plays music for the plants.

It can so far grow more than 30 different kinds of herbs and vegetables, including basil, kale, and arugula Ė but, itíll cost you $14,000.

According to the creators, the Kitchen Garden doesnít use soil, allowing it to monitor each step of the plantís growth.

At full capacity, it can feed a family of four, exhibitors explained to Dailymail.com, and can fit 32-64 plants within its slim frame.

Read more at Daily Mail Online

Publication date: 1/9/2017

 


 

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