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EPA clarifies first aid statements on pesticide product labels

The Environmental Protection Agency is clarifying where first aid statements must be placed on pesticide product labels. First aid statements provide important information concerning appropriate first aid in the event of accidental exposure to a pesticide.

First aid statements must be immediately visible on a pesticide product when the product is sold or distributed. It should not require opening a booklet or other manipulation of the label to read the first aid statement.

For the most hazardous products (Toxicity Category I), the first aid statement must appear on the front panel unless we have approved something different. For Toxicity Categories II or III, the first aid statement can appear on the front, side or back panel, but it must be visible without manipulation of the label. If a registrant chooses to list first aid statements for Toxicity Category IV products, this language must also appear on a visible panel.

Recent variation in types of labels has led to less-consistent placement of the first aid statement. Because of the importance of first aid information, we have decided to make it clearer to registrants where first aid statements must appear on labels. EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs has sent a memorandum to pesticide registrants clarifying the required placement of first aid statements. Read the memorandum in the docket (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OPP-2016-0545). You may submit comments via the docket on this memorandum until January 6, 2017.

EPA plans to update the Label Review Manual to include this information.

Source: IPM in the South

Publication date: 12/9/2016

 


 

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